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Faust (Фауст)

- faust.jpg
International title Faust
Section 49 edición - Sección Oficial Largometrajes
Country Rusia
Year 2011
Format DCP
Color / B&W Color
Running time 135 min
Original language Alemán
Director Alexander Sokurov
Screenplay Juri Arabov, Alexander Sokurov, Marina Koreneva
Film Editing Jörg Hauschild
Photography Bruno Delbonnel
Music Andrey Sigle
Costume Lidia Krukova
Production Andrey Sigle
Production design Elena Zhukova
Cast Johannes Zeiler, Anton Adasinskiy, Isolda Dychauk, Georg Friedrich, Hanna Schygulla, Antje Lewald, Florian Bruckner, Maxim Mehmet, Sigurdur Skulasson
Producer Proline Film
Distribution Company Golem Distribución
Synopsis This is not an adaptation of Goethe’s tragedy in the usual sense, but a reading between the lines. Guided by his perpetual unhappiness and by his simplest instincts (hunger, lust, greed), Doctor Faust moves anonymously around. He is a thinker, a transmitter of ideas embarked on ambitious scientific projects and ready to restlessly advance without realizing time remains in suspense. He comes across a Mephistophelian character who, rather than presenting himself as poet and agitator capable of changing his appearance at will, shows a sibylline appearance, with a deformed body and thin reddish hair. After meeting the beautiful Gretchen in a washhouse, Faust is captivated by the beauty of the young lady and decides to sell his soul to the repulsive old man in exchange for love. The film also recovers the character of Faust’s father, a healer whose peculiar practices have resulted in the deaths of several people.
Director bio Alexander Sokúrov was born in Podorvikha (Irkutsk, Russia) in 1951, and studied history at Nizhny Novgorod University. Most of his early films were banned by Soviet authorities, though he began to attract global attention with Mournful Unconcern (completed in 83; released in 87). He has been nominated for the Palme D'Or award at Cannes four times. His subsequent work includes Father and Son (1997; received three awards at Moscow), Moloch (1999), Taurus (2001), Russian Ark (2002), The Sun (2004), Alexandra (2007) and Faust (2011; Golden Lion award at Venice).